The New New in NYC

To open the 2016 artwork exhibition season at the Kenise Barnes Fine Art gallery in Larchmont, New York, The New New showcase will feature some of the country's most talented artists. 

No home is truly complete with artwork that evokes the spirit and personality of its owner. To open the 2016 artwork exhibition season at the Kenise Barnes Fine Art Gallery in Larchmont, New York, The New New showcase will feature some of the country’s most talented artists.

“Abstract oil paintings, paper sculptures and watercolors are all available.”

With everything from abstract oil paintings to hand-cut paper sculptures to watercolor-tattooed drawings, The New New makes finding an impressive work of art suitable for display in even the most impressive luxury real estate locales simply a matter of time and taste. A visit to Kenise Barnes Fine Art offers such a range of creative culture that there is something for every discerning eye.

Founded in 1994, the fine art gallery and consulting firm exhibits more than 40 emerging and mid-career artists working in a wide variety of exciting mediums. Owner and director Kenise Barnes has over two decades worth of experience in the arts, having worked as a specialist at the prestigious Christie’s East before making her own way as a curator and art advisor.

Some of the most famous organizations in the world – including New York University, Pfizer Corporation, and Vicente Wolf Associates – have been among the gallery’s patrons.

From Jan. 9 to Feb. 13, visitors will find an exhilarating exhibition of incredible artists from around the country. This is just a small selection of those featured:

Charles Clary
It would be difficult to find an artist who uses paper in the same way Charles Clary does. By cutting and layering it multiple times over, he builds his own otherworldly reality, a kind of organic landscape that seems to grow like an idea come to life.

David Collins
Nothing is quite static in David Collins’ work. Everything has energy, it moves and folds and shifts across the planes of his paintings, forcing you to adjust focus with each new structure and shape. There is a flavor of 1970s disruption here, an invocation of architecture unstable as a memory.

Abstract oil paintings will be just one of the many art forms on display. Abstract oil paintings will be just one of the many art forms on display.

June Edmonds
A newcomer to Kenise Barnes, June Edmonds is fascinated by the balance and repetition of meditation. Her work features the West African Adinkra, whose concentric circles evoke an elemental power that verges on the spiritual. But there is also song here, a kind of vibrating rhythm that moves forever inward.

Francine Fox
A master of many mediums – oil paint, gouache and watercolor among them – Francine Fox is celebrated for her psychological, almost disturbing pieces made with graphite and ink. Students of history will find her work especially fascinating. With references to the past invoked through a cultural, visual vocabulary, she speaks in unique ways.

Stephen Grossman
With the kind of attention to perception which Cezanne made so famous, Stephen Grossman’s work has a quality of being half-seen, a disruptive image caught out of focus and nearly out of sight. These paintings are memories – cloudy, incomplete and reminiscent of the truth rather than the truth itself.

Andrea Kantrowitz
Few pieces will instantly capture a viewer’s attention like those from the hand of Andrea Kantrowitz. “Daughters of Leucippus,” her new series of paintings, demonstrates her mastery of precision and eye for detail. These close-up investigations of ripped fruit and vegetables are rendered in vivid, living color.