Greenwich Symphony Orchestra

On March 12 & 13, Greenwich will be home to some of the finest classical music in the world, played by a musician of incomparable talent. 

greenwich symphony

In what will surely be a weekend to remember, the Greenwich Symphony will present acclaimed violinist Bella Hristova at the Greenwich High School Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. on March 12 and 4 p.m. on March 13.  For these two days, the city will be home to some of the finest classical music in the world, played by a musician of incomparable talent.

Hristova_LisaMarieMazzucco1“Hristova has been lauded for her passionate style.”

Hristova is renowned for her passionate, dynamic performances. Yet the spirit and beauty of her play never sacrifices control for power.

She is a disciplined violinist in total command of her instrument, one whose youth and flourishing international reputation as a soloist and recording artist promise a future of great achievement. Hristova’s 2013 Avery Fisher Career Grant – a prestigious recognition of talent – is surely just the start to an incredible career.

This weekend, audiences will be treated to a remarkable performance by Hristova of works by masters like Prokofiev and Mendelssohn. Here’s a brief glimpse at what awaits:

Symphony No. 1 in D Major, Op. 25
Composed by Sergei Prokofiev, the enfant terrible of 20th century Russian composers, at his best in 1917, this symphony is incredible for its measured power. It is a savage yet precisely controlled work brought to vigorous life by Hristova.

Violin Concerto
Frederick Delius composed four concertos – one for piano, one for cello, another for violin and cello. The one that will be featured this weekend was written exclusively for violin. Delius’ wrote lyrical, free-flowing melodies that reflect moods and gestures rather than narratives. His concerto in Hristova’s hands will surely be beautiful.

Havanaise for Violin and Orchestra in E Major, Op. 83
The French word for the Spanish habanera (a slow song or dance) is Havanaise, and that’s the title of Camille Saint-Saens’ work from 1887. Originally set for violin and piano, it is now more commonly remembered for its enrapturing soloist melody – one that Hristova can play like few others.

Tickets for the performance can be purchased here.